The name "Eccleshill" means the hill of the church, and refers (we think) to a chapel in the village centre hundreds of years ago. But the idea of building a Church of England church in Eccleshill was first acted on by William Scoresby, a former Arctic explorer who became vicar of Bradford (in the days when what is now the cathedral was the parish church of St Peter, Bradford). He wanted to do something to help the poor people of Eccleshill (which was then part of his parish); and so with help, he got hold of the corner of the meadow which stretched uphill from Fagley Lane, between Harrogate Road and Fagley Road; and he first built the school in 1842 and then the church in 1848.

The church building originally had a spire, but this had to be taken down in the 1950's after a piece of the top had fallen off and efforts to stabilize the structure had failed (the metal strappings from these efforts can still be seen). The distinctive open tower was built in the 1970's to support the gable end wall of the building.

Inside the building is well-kept. The glass is mostly plain, but the east window is worth seeing - it focuses on a crucifixion scene in its centre, but at the top is a picture of Jesus as portrayed in Revelation 1, with seven stars in his hand which he wants to place on the seven candles before him: it's a statement that the purpose of our building is that Jesus may put his Spirit into the lives of the people of Eccleshill.  The other pictured window, at the side of the nave, illustrates Jesus' teaching in Matthew 25 and shows the concern which his followers should have for the poor and needy: the purpose of our building is to help us to care for others.

The building has to be kept locked (and all the metal marked with smart water, and so on), but we welcome visitors and if you wish to see round, please get in touch.